Reports 2019-09-26T16:41:03+00:00
Market-Based Approach for Moneylending in Malaysia

SEANET Perspective No 9 – Market-Based Approach for Moneylending in Malaysia

A lack of access to financial markets is a common challenge faced by the poor across ASEAN  countries. Without access to traditional lines of credit or banking, the poor and undocumented  often rely on informal means to manage their money. Moneylending is a form of informal financing  that has played an important role in facilitating private sector growth and the livelihood of  communities that fall beyond the reach of the formal financial system.

There is much confusion among the public in Malaysia between licensed money lending and  loan sharking, negatively tainting the reputation of licensed moneylenders. In addition, some  think that licensed moneylenders have the same business model and operate exactly like a  bank. To deal with these issues and other misconceptions faced by the industry, a heavy handed  enforcement approach has been adopted by the government. These efforts empower the police  and authorities with increasing powers, and has resulted in unintended consequences that choke  the operations of licensed moneylenders.

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Intellectual property rights & Health - The ASEAN Context

SEANET Perspective No 8 – A macro analysis of intellectual property rights in ASEAN context

Intellectual property protection has a positive effect on all four economic indicators: gross domestic product (GDP), trade, foreign direct investments (FDI) and the level of innovation. The confidence it gives investors leads to inflows of foreign capital that promote technology competition, which in turn fosters innovation. As a result, higher quality goods and service are produced within the country more efficiently. This would increases the competitive advantage of the county in terms of exports and positively impact its GDP growth.

This paper presents the state of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) protection in ASEAN using the Global Intellectual Property Center (GIPC) Index and ascertains why some countries have been more successful in safeguarding IPR compared with others. The GIPC Index evaluates the level of IP protection in a country based on 30 indicators. In ASEAN, countries have significantly varied performances with countries like Singapore and Malaysia performing well, while Thailand and Vietnam perform poorly.

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Intellectual property rights & Health - The ASEAN Context

SEANET Perspective No 7 – Intellectual property rights & Health – The ASEAN Context

Studies have shown that better health outcomes are reached with increased trade openness and human development, particularly in lower-income countries. To facilitate international trade and catalyse economic growth, countries should promote robust intellectual property rights (IPR). A strong and effective IPR system will support, protect and stimulate innovation. It will also encourage transfers of technology and increase the availability of products in new markets.

The link between IPR protection and drug affordability is controversial. The price of medicine is strongly influenced by the considerable amounts of money that is invested by pharmaceutical companies into the development of new treatments, the majority of which fail. Generics have an important role to play in adjusting price mechanisms but are sometimes an unreliable substitute. A number of developing countries have argued that IPR can hamper their ability to intervene in public health matters and decrease accessibility, but this paper suggest that steps can be taken to mitigate these concerns.

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Reducing deforestation by strengthening communal property rights

SEANET Perspective No 6 – Reducing deforestation by strengthening communal property rights

Despite a moratorium by the Indonesian government rejecting new logging concessions since May 2011, Indonesia saw 840,000 hectares of forests cleared in 2012 and deforestation levels continue to increase at an alarming rate every year. International experiences have shown that chances of sustainable long-term forest management improve when the ownership and management of forest resources remain with local communities.

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The trans-pacific partnership - Seizing the opportunities, losing the myths

SEANET Perspective No 5 – The trans-pacific partnership – Seizing the opportunities, losing the myths

This paper is an edited version of a keynote speech delivered by the author at the Conference on U.S-Malaysia Commercial Relations in Kuala Lumpur on 26 August 2015, organised by the American Malaysian Chamber of Commerce (AMCHAM) and the US Chamber of Commerce. In the speech, the author explains several myths surrounding traderelated issues in Malaysia today, and he goes on to call the private sector to be more active in engaging the public.

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Anti-market bias and its threat to property

SEANET Perspective No 4 – Anti-market bias and its threat to

Economies that rely on openness and trade for their prosperity must be based on sound and secure property rights, including intellectual property rights. Increasingly, the basis for sound economic policy is coming under threat from activists who display an anti-market bias.

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Reducing the financial burden of Indonesian migrant workers

SEANET Perspective No 3 – Reducing the financial burden of Indonesian

In 2014, more than 400,000 Indonesians officially left their villages and joined millions of Indonesians who are working in foreign countries. They mostly come from low-income households in rural and remote parts of Indonesia. Through their regular remittances to local bank accounts they support their families and villages at home with more than USD 8 billion per year (2014). The World Bank estimated these remittances have lowered the poverty rate in Indonesia by 26.7% during 2000 – 2007. They are of tremendous importance for inclusive growth and equitable opportunities for the Indonesian countryside

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The case for unilateral trade liberalisation in ASEAN

SEANET Perspective No 2 – The case for unilateral trade liberalisation in ASEAN

Trade is part of human nature. There are many things and services that people need for survival and convenience that they themselves cannot produce efficiently. Hence, trade between and among people has occurred naturally.

If trade is so basic and important, it should be kept as free as possible, with minimal hindrance and restrictions by politicians and other special interest groups via high tariffs and various non-tariff barriers (NTBs).

For trade between and among people in different countries, or at least within a region to be truly free, trade liberalization should be done unilaterally

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Governments cannot choose what is good for us

SEANET Perspective No 1 – Governments cannot choose what is good for us

These functions of government are based on the fundamental understanding that the citizens are the bosses, the principals, and the politicians and bureaucrats their temporarily elected or appointed agents. Worldwide experience has shown that, in most circumstances, only well-protected individuals and firms can make the right choices and find the right knowledge to advance, as far as possible, the material and psychological well-being of all. As experience with central planning has shown time and again, government agencies simply lack theknowledge to choose what is in the best long-term interest of the people.

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Combating Corruption toward Clean Governance in Asia: Country Cases

Combating Corruption toward Clean Governance in Asia: Country Cases

Date: March 2018

IDEAS is a member of the Asia Democracy Research Network (ADRN), a network of think tanks and research organisations from across Asia that works on strengthening democracy in the region. In 2017, IDEAS Coordinator of Democracy and Governance, Aira Azhari contributed a chapter on Malaysia in an ADRN publication entitled “Combating Corruption toward Clean Governance in Asia: Country Cases.” This special report evaluates the current state of corruption in the region by studying the strengths and weaknesses of each country’s mechanisms including law and regulations, public participation, and public governance. The report investigates pressing, contemporary questions such as: What is the state of corruption in Asia? What successes and failures has each country experienced in controlling corruption? How can state of corruption in Asia be improved?

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